Teacher values and relationship factors in education

teacher values and relationship factors in education

Although most research regarding teacher-student relationships investigate the Teachers who support students in the learning environment can positively impact There are several factors that can protect against the negative outcomes. When students feel that you value and care for them as individuals, they are more a favorable learning climate is a positive relationship with our students” (p. 6). . One thing you can do is ask a teaching peer to observe your instruction and. Intrigued by the notion that effective teaching is as much about relationship as it is about 'technical' proficiency, the author examines the values of teachers that.

Latency is the amount of time that elapses between the moment you give a student a response opportunity and the moment you terminate the response opportunity. Kerman and colleagues explain that the amount of time we give to students to answer questions is directly related to the level of expectation we have for them.

Teacher Values and Relationship : Factors in Values Education - Semantic Scholar

We give more time to students when we have confidence in their ability to answer a question. Conversely, we give less time to students in whom we have little confidence.

When you quickly give up on a student who is struggling with a response, it is clear to everyone in the classroom that you don't expect him or her to come up with the right answer.

What you will find when you make a conscious effort to extend the length of latency you allow for low-achieving students is that these students will begin to pay more attention, become more actively involved in discussions, and minimize their behavior issues. One thing you can do is ask a teaching peer to observe your instruction and chart the length of the latency periods you are giving each student from the time you ask the question until you move on to another student.

It is especially interesting to find out which students get longer latency periods from you. Latency Chart in Seconds Paul Brown: In analyzing the chart, it is easy to see that Donna and Mary are consistently given more latency and, therefore, more chances to give a correct response than are the other students. If this were your classroom, you could try to make sure that in future discussions and question-and-answer periods you give longer latency periods to other students as well before moving on.

Teacher Values and Relationship : Factors in Values Education

Give Hints and Clues to Help Students Answer Questions You also communicate positive expectations by giving hints and clues to your students. It is important that we communicate to all our students that we have high expectations for their success, and one way to do this is by giving more hints and clues to all students, especially the low-performing students.

Think about a reading lesson in which a student struggles to sound out a word. If you provide too many hints and clues, you may actually give the student the answer. Also, after a number of hints, it may be that the only student who doesn't know the answer is the one being called on, which ends up being an embarrassing experience.

The important point, however, is to use hints and clues with all students to communicate that you have high expectations for the entire class. This helps build positive teacher-student relations.

Tell Students They Have the Ability to Do Well Another way to communicate positive expectations to students is by directly telling them they have the ability to do well.

teacher values and relationship factors in education

When you tell your students you have confidence that they can handle a difficult assignment or improve their behavior, you impart a very powerful message. Students often will work hard and behave appropriately to prove that your confidence in them is justified. Every child needs to have at least one significant adult in his or her life who believes that he or she can do well. Ideally, children would hear this from their parents, but the sad truth is that is not always the case.

Teachers have the unique opportunity and privilege to communicate daily to a number of students that they believe in them. What a gift to be able to be that significant adult in even one student's life. Using this strategy might lead a teacher to say this to a student: You've been working very hard on remembering to write down your thinking as you solve math problems, and I know you can transfer that skill to this test. I'll check back with you later. Once again, this is a positive relations strategy as well as an instructional strategy.

You can also let students know that you have positive expectations for them by referring to past successes Kerman et al. When you tell a student that you know he will behave appropriately at recess because he was successful yesterday, you help build confidence in the student and increase his chance for success.

And after a student demonstrates good behavior or academic achievement in a specific situation, telling her you knew she would be successful Kerman et al. Students need to know that their teachers respect them and have confidence in them. Using these different strategies to consistently communicate your positive expectations will work wonders.

teacher values and relationship factors in education

We challenge you to begin using one or two of these strategies today to build high expectations and positive teacher-student relations. Correcting Students in a Constructive Way Correcting and disciplining students for inappropriate behaviors is a necessary and important part of every teacher's job.

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

However, it doesn't have to be a negative part of your job. In fact, you can actually build positive relationships when you correct students.

If you don't believe this, think for just a minute about students you have had in the past who came back to school to visit you. Often it is the students who were the most challenging and with whom you had to spend the most time who continue to visit you over the years. This is due to the positive relationships you developed with them.

The goal in correcting students should be to have them reflect on what they did, be sorry that they disappointed you, and make a better choice in the future. I'm going to be sure I don't get caught next time.

If you allow students to keep their dignity, you increase the chance that they will reflect on their behavior and choose their behaviors more wisely in the future. The correction process will be counterproductive if students are corrected in a manner that communicates bitterness, sarcasm, low expectations, or disgust. Further, teacher-student relationships can impact peer relationships in schools. Teacher-student relationships can have a significant effect on the peer acceptance of students.

Conflicting interactions between teachers and students may convey a lack of acceptance, causing other students to also reject the student involved in the conflict with the teacher Hughes et al. Peer rejection significantly impacts self-esteem of students leading to several negative social outcomes Hughes et al.

Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

As mentioned earlier, students with high self-esteem are more likely to be self-efficacious and set higher goals Ryan et al. Students with high self-esteem are more likely to have positive relationships with peers as well as with adults Orth et al.

teacher values and relationship factors in education

Self-esteem is especially important during adolescence and helps students develop a positive sense of self Orth et al. A positive sense of self in adolescence leads to future outcomes including relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction, occupational status, emotional regulation, and physical health Orth et al.

The support of positive teacher-student relationships for self-esteem and related social outcomes affects students during schooling as well as in their future educational and occupational outcomes Orth et al.

teacher values and relationship factors in education

Conclusion and Limitations Although there is extensive research on the positive effects of teacher-student relationships on elementary school students, there is little research on middle and high school students. Middle and high school is when students begin to think about their academic futures, which are informed by academic achievement and social capital in elementary years Alexander et al.

Early high school is usually when students dedicate themselves to graduating or decide to drop out Henry et al. Currently, high school dropout rates are high, and improving teacher-student relationships for students at this stage may decrease dropout rates Henry et al. Similarly, high school is when students decide if they plan to attend college or stop their education Alexander et al. Therefore, it is important to develop positive teacher-student relationships during this time.

Empirical evidence does show that teacher-student relationships are very important for high school students Alexander et al. However, much of this research is dated. Due to the ever-changing nature of the American educational system and the increasingly diverse student body, more current studies are needed to look at the effects of teacher-student relationships for this changing population.

Conducting research on the relationship between high school students and teachers may be essential in improving the outcomes of low-income middle and high school students, and can potentially inform future interventions to help older students perform better both academically and socially.

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teacher values and relationship factors in education

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