Bilbo and gandalf relationship goals

Bilbo Baggins Relationships | The Hobbit Film Trilogy Wikia | FANDOM powered by Wikia

bilbo and gandalf relationship goals

According to the books of the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings, Gandalf is known to hobbits and to Bilbo, but Hobbits are rather insular in general. As an outsider. So was rewatching the movies this weekend with my wife and I wondered how Gandalf's relationship with Bilbo and Frodo differed. To simplify. Re #2, Gandalf didn't know that Bilbo's Ring was the One Ring until the scene .. 1) No issue – the goal of Gandalf and the Dwarves was the same, and the . to Shire, Saruman was installed there just for couple of months.

Sometimes it may even seem that although younger in age, Sam cared about him like a parent cares for a child. From the very beginning he watched anxiously over his security and wellbeing.

bilbo and gandalf relationship goals

The purpose of everything he did was to help Frodo as much as he could, and this carried on throughout the story. As he said, he would never mean any harm to Frodo.

So even if he did something that he first perceived as contradictory to his love, like when he joined the conspiracy with Pippin and Merry to spy on Frodo, or when he was eavesdropping on his talk with Gandalf, it was only with the best intentions. This happened in the beginning because he was a simple, inexperienced person; until this time he had never traveled farther than twenty miles away from his home.

But later, as he became more aware of life behind the borders of his little country, he realized that a merciful lie or concealment of the truth was harmless and even necessary if he did not want to trouble his master.

So he often used it as they neared Mordor; for instance, when he did not speak the truth about their dwindling food or that he saved his share for Frodo.

  • Characterization: Relationship between Bilbo and Gandalf
  • Frodo and Sam’s Relationship in the Light of Aristotle’s Philia
  • 4 LOTR Friendship Goals That We All Want to Have

After this he somehow felt responsible for Frodo. And partially from this promise, in combination with his devotion to his master, there results a determination to follow Frodo no matter what, and his already mentioned willingness to give his life for him, although yet he had no clear idea what peril may await them.

Nonetheless, he made a pact with himself to never leave his master, motivated by some unidentifiable inner feeling that he has to do something before the end. He confessed it when Frodo, after considering that he should not lead his friend into unknown danger but rather go on his own because the Ring is his alone, indirectly offered him a chance to rethink his decision and stay in the Shire. I never mean to.

Sam even implemented this literally when he actually accompanied Frodo everywhere he went. This statement was the first open demonstration of his conviction, and though it is evidently a motivation of all his doings, it manifested itself in two more situations that were crucial for the subsequent development of the plot.

In the former case, he could have stayed in Rivendell with Elves, since until now meeting them has been his greatest dream and also the original though only assumed reason of his coming with Frodo, or rest there for some time and then return to Hobbiton.

But although he had already gained some notion of how dangerous this journey will be, he preferred to go on. Similarly, in the second case he had a chance for a better destiny than to plod through dying land, starving, straight into the hands of enemy.

By now he was well aware of all the peril. He could have chosen an easier way and gone to Minas Tirith with Boromir and Aragorn At this point of time Sam did not know what happened to the rest of the Fellowship until he was reunited with them after the completion of the quest, and believed that the remaining seven would go to Gondor, since at least the men intended so from the beginning.

Nevertheless, he insisted on following his master, and when Frodo seemed to ignore him, he did not hesitate to jump into water to stop him, even though he could not swim. But while in general his determination proved to be a lucky decision, in one instance it almost meant a definite end to the quest and an absolute disaster for the whole Middle-earth. It was in the passage of Cirith Ungol at the border of Mordor, when he thought his master dead after he had been poisoned by Shelob the giant spider.

He knew that he had to resume the quest. But even more hazardous was his resolution to go to the orc tower full of enemies and save his master when he found out he was only paralyzed.

Had he left Frodo to his own fortune and centered only on the task, the quest might have been completed earlier and maybe more easily. But his love for Frodo was bigger than his moral obligation to the Free Peoples of Middle-earth. Another quality that the journey revealed in Sam, which is closely related to his overall conviction, is vigilance. He became watchful and suspicious of every stranger from the very beginning, and its level remained constant throughout the entire story.

bilbo and gandalf relationship goals

While the other two younger hobbits developed their sense of wariness only slowly, with Sam it seems to come up as soon as they left Bag End. But he actually proved right with Gollum. It began with the stubborn resolution that if anyone meant any harm to Frodo, he should first fight with him.

But since it had not yet come to a direct confrontation with enemies, and there is no any evidence of them fighting with the Black Riders at Weathertop, it is not certain whether he would really be able to strike or give way to fear. But later, when Frodo was in immediate danger, he forgot his own fears or limitations, like in the scene at the Gate of Moria when Sam remained the only one with clear senses, not paralyzed by fear, and slashed the tentacle that grasped Frodo and tried to pull him underwater.

It has been already noted that at the beginning he thought him to be the best and cleverest person in the world. However, by the time they reached Mordor, he admitted that Frodo was not always perfect and he not only found some of his decisions wrong, but no longer hesitated to show his disagreement openly. Certainly, their opinions differed the most regarding whether or not to keep Gollum as their guide.

But in spite of this change, they have become closer and more intimate than they were before the journey. Sam was still aware of the social difference between him and Frodo and recognized himself as inferior, yet even in this can be spotted a slight difference. Until their stay in Rivendell, he used it more frequently than after the forming of the Fellowship of the Ring. So it is clear that his relationship to Frodo has developed from mere friendship of pleasure into a deeper friendship.

Frodo, preoccupied by his burden of the Ring, did not much openly manifest what Sam meant to him, so it appears as if his attitude has not developed. However, the contrary is true. He knew that he might die in the attempt to accomplish the quest and he did not want this for his friends, including Sam.

He did not want them to suffer because of him and his unfortunate heirloom. Therefore he tried to dissuade them from the journey twice before his departure from the Shire. First, it was during the earlier mentioned situation when he discussed it only with Sam, and then in the house in Crickhollow when the conspiracy was unmasked.

Yet, he did not make much effort to deter them from coming with him. The reason for this is probably that he was afraid to go on his own. He was actually happy that he did not have to face the peril alone. This shows that the level of concern for his friends was rather low. Had he wholly apprehended how dangerous he and the Ring was for them, he would not trouble himself with explaining it and would rather steal out secretly in the night, probably even leaving Sam behind.

But he did not. However, a test of his affection for his friends came soon after, which he nearly failed. Initially it occurred to him that he could escape with the help of the Ring and leave the other three there. But then his love for his friends won and he did not abandon them.

The first thing he asked, after he realized where he was, was: This may seem an insignificant exclamation, but following a month of journeying together, it reveals much about the development of his relationship to Sam and how important he has become to Frodo.

The fact that the first thing he thought about was what happened to his friend, implies that he has started to worry about him. Later, as his awareness of the danger he represents for the fellowship increased, he was becoming still more convinced that he must accomplish the task on his own.

He was determined to leave instantly, without confronting any member of the fellowship. Therefore, invisible with the Ring on, he even pretended not to take any notice of Sam whom he must doubtlessly have seen running towards him to stop him.

Again he tried to persuade him not to follow. This was actually the first time Frodo spoke about his feelings to Sam. Based on this, it is obvious that he no longer treated him as a mere servant, but that Sam has become very dear to him, so dear that he would feel guilty if he died because of him. It is interesting that Frodo did not talk about his feelings and emotions much.

This may be a result of being an orphan lacking the love and interest of his relatives who raised him in his childhood 2. Probably it was never easy for him to speak about his feelings, because the people he lived with did not understand him.

And it remained a problem for him even later when he moved to the Bag End and was surrounded by such loving people like Sam. That is why he so seldom acknowledged how much Sam meant to him in comparison with this gardener who, being the simpler one, often told him how much he liked him. Instead, to show Sam how much he appreciated his services, Frodo preferred subtle but meaningful gestures.

But what is more, Frodo was aware that Sam knew him so well that he could usually guess his thoughts and understand him even without words, so he did not need to affirm his love orally.

He did so only in two instances. One is the moment described above, and the other time it is after the Ring has been destroyed. Standing at the hillside of Mount Doom he said: In the past Frodo used to be very secretive, not only about the Ring, just like Gandalf had warned him, but he also used to keep all his personal affairs to himself.

Just to mention one, he often used to wander the country without anyone knowing the reasons for it, which worried his friends. He only became a little more open about his plans and intentions with Sam, after he discovered that his servant knew about the Ring as much as himself, yet never spoke a word of it.

When he realized that he could rely on him and sees his determination and love, he kept no secrets from him any longer. Anyway, it would be pointless since Sam knew him so well.

Characterization: Relationship between Bilbo and Gandalf | Helena's journal

So it is that Sam became the only confidante with whom he could discuss his worries and ideas. For instance, Sam was the only one to whom Frodo presented his very first piece of poetry inspired by his sorrow for the loss of Gandalf. However, in one matter regarding his secretiveness he always remained the same—that although the Ring started to gain ever greater power over him, he never complained, never spoke about what troubled him and how much he suffered.

The nearer they got to Mordor and Mount Doom, the more Frodo was preoccupied with his burden and his diminishing hope of ever completing his quest. Were it not for Sam, Frodo would never have accomplished it, since he gave up hope completely soon after his rescue from the orc tower.

It has been pointed out that before the journey he never called him his friend. He did not consider him to be one, certainly not a close one, for his friendship with Sam was based on utility. There were other people whom he recognized as his best friends. But after what they have gone through and when Sam remained his only companion after the breaking of the Fellowship, their relationship changed. Although to Faramir he presented Sam as his servant and gardener, in private he once named Sam: So, finally he confirmed him to be his friend, moreover, the best of all his friends.

It is because the friendship of utility, which Frodo had for Sam, is less similar to true friendship than the friendship of pleasure, which Sam had for Frodo; therefore it had to undergo a greater transformation to turn into a more valuable type. Their Relationship after the War of the Ring Now that the Ring was destroyed and the victory appropriately celebrated, the four hobbits returned home to their old lifestyles. Or at least Frodo and Sam tried to pick up the old life, although it would never be the same because of all the things they have experienced.

While Sam aligned to his previous life more easily, Frodo was affected by the long influence of his burden. As a result, he again became withdrawn and did not speak about his feelings much, partially because he did not want to worry Sam. In addition, his own suffering has taught him how insignificant were many of the problems of his former life, or the current issues of his kinsmen. Consequently, he became almost a pacifist, for which Tom Shippey criticizes himp.

And after a time being a Deputy Mayor, he completely withdrew from public life. Yet, at least the relationship between him and Sam retained its recently gained dimension. So Sam now became an equal master of Bag End. Furthermore, in the end Frodo also named him his heir.

Sam, who had become a respectable person, was happy because he could still stay near Frodo and attend to him. He even decided to name his first-born son after his master, as he still called him. However, there appeared an unexpected interference with their relationship.

It came out that, apart from friendly love to Frodo, he kept a romantic love for Rose Cotton, a hobbit girl from his neigbourhood, and his childhood friend.

This sudden romantic desire was quite surprising because he had never mentioned her until the third chapter of Book Six, when Sam remembered her for the first time.

Presumably, it was the near-death experience as, thirsty and starving, he thought that he would certainly die even if the quest succeeded, that enhanced his love. And when they finally came home and saw what a mess there was, it seemed that he was unable to decide which one was more important for him at that moment, since Rosie was evidently willing to repay his affection. He turned away and mounted his pony. But as he started off, Rosie ran down the steps.

Frodo and Sam’s Relationship in the Light of Aristotle’s Philia – Fellowship & Fairydust

But take care of yourself, and come straight back as soon as you have settled the ruffians! But Frodo knew that what Sam really desired was to live a peaceful life with his family, so he decided it for him. Self-sacrifice is the most virtuous demonstration of friendly love observable only within true friendship, and consequently every such friendship involves it at certain point, if the need arises. Such is the nature of friendship. And because good men naturally seek only what is virtuous, they do not mind this, for it is the greatest virtue.

Moreover, it is a way of gaining nobility. Therefore it is important to investigate how relevant that self-sacrifice was for their friendship. He feared going into unknown lands. He would have preferred staying at home, comfortable with his life, but he realized that the Ring presented too big a danger for his homeland and its people. Because of that fear, he first tried to give the Ring to Gandalf, but when the wizard refused it, Frodo began to understand that he had no other choice if he wanted to protect the Shire folk, even though he was not always on friendly terms with some of them.

I feel that as long as the Shire lies behind, safe and comfortable, I shall find wandering more bearable: I shall know that somewhere there is a firm foothold, even if my feet cannot stand there again. Although this idea was actually uttered first by Bilbo, not Frodo. However, Frodo was, and so he must have felt the responsibility in his heart, unlike Bilbo. So he gave up even this opportunity to stay in the Elven house of healing, and continued his struggle for the good of the Free Peoples of Middle-earth.

But in both cases his motives were rather general. Therefore, his sacrifice was not relevant to his relationship to Sam. All pleasures of his normal life were gradually replaced by pain and suffering, the psychological being worse than the physical.

His mind was tormented by the will of the Ring; he constantly had to fight it. He lost his personal integrity. He actually sacrificed all his self in the quest. And when he returned back to the Shire, he found out that his life would never be the same, because he would never be the same. He was not able to enjoy what he had sacrificed his life for. The security of his homeland, which was supposed to make his wandering bearable, did not make him confident anymore. The impact of his decision was far greater than he expected.

And although he would love to return to his previous life, to remain with friends and see them marry and raise children, it was impossible for him. So in the end he had to give up even this, and depart from Middle-earth forever. It has been already noted that from the very beginning he had been determined even to die for Frodo in order to spare his master.

It started off with an unanswered offering to carry more load instead of Frodo, which just hints at his readiness to surrender his personal comfort for the good of his friend, but it gradually increased in intensity and relevance.

But comparatively, he too sacrificed the pleasures of his life as he set out on the journey with Frodo, exchanging it for whole day tramping, sleeping in the wilderness for weeks without a soft bed or hot bath, hiding, and lacking enough to eat. But since we are never told how big his affection for his homeland was, it is not certain whether leaving it meant any sorrow for him. He only regretted leaving it when he came back and found all the nice places he liked in ruin.

The actual sacrifice resulting from his departure was having to postpone his aborning love for Rose, leaving her there without admitting his feelings to her and without any credible hope that he might ever return and see her again.

But his sacrifices became more demanding after the breaking of the Fellowship. At this moment he gave up the prospect of soon reaching a comfortable, safe place — meaning Minas Tirith — that would end this strenuous plodding, and continued on the journey with Frodo, which became even more grueling and perilous. And after they entered Mordor, Sam sacrificed his sleep in order to keep watch over his master.

He gave up his share of food so that Frodo could have more, and gave him most of the water, too, eating very little and thirsting. Or on a different occasion, he insisted on testing stream water they came upon in Mordor before Frodo could drink it, in case it was poisonous. But his sacrifice reached its peak in the last phase of their journey towards Mount Doom, when he carried Frodo up the slope of the mountain on his back. In one other instance, his sacrifice also evoked a kind of miracle.

He decided to carry the Ring onward and leave his beloved Frodo there. However, this reward was not without drawbacks.

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First, achieving the reconciliation was not effortless; Sam actually had to fight his way to save Frodo, although thanks to a strange turn of fortune, most of the enemies in the orc tower had been cleared off before he came there. And second, the award was only momentary and would soon result in much grief for Sam. Yet the greatest sacrifice he had to undergo came only at the very end of the story. As it has been already noted, like Frodo had to leave what he loved and was fighting for—his country, Sam also had to leave and give up what he loved the most—his dearest friend, whom he had served so faithfully for so many years and for whom he suffered all this.

The departure was not as much of a sacrifice for Frodo, since he was going to the Undying Lands, which was something like a paradise, a place of ease, where his wounds would be healed. For since he had always been so devoted to Frodo, now he lost the purpose of his life. It left an empty space in his heart, as depicted in the scene when he was coming home from the Grey Havens accompanied by Merry and Pippin.

And although he too sailed to the West in his old age ibid. Is It True Friendship? As it has been just evinced, the relationship between Frodo and Sam did, over the course of time, naturally change and evolve. It got perceptibly deeper, closer, and more intimate; it reached a new dimension. But what did it ultimately turn into? Aristotle distinguished three main types of friendship, the third being the friendship of virtue, also called the true friendship, which has so far been disregarded because the initial nature of their friendship did not fit it.

During his journey, Bilbo encountered other fantastic creatures, including TrollsElves, giant spidersBeorn a man who could change into a bearGoblinsEaglesWargand a murderous creature named Gollum.

Underground, near Gollum's lair under the Misty Mountains, Bilbo accidentally found a magic ring of invisibility that he used to escape from Gollum. By the end of the journey, Bilbo had become wiser and more confident, having saved the day in many precarious situations.

Bilbo's journey has been compared to a pilgrimage of grace. The Hobbit can be characterized as a "Christian bildungsroman which equates progress to wisdom gained in the form of a rite of passage".

The Hobbit

He used the magic ring to sneak around in dangerous places, and he used his wits to smuggle the 13 Dwarves out of the Wood-elves' prison. When tensions arose over ownership of the treasures beneath the Lonely Mountain, Bilbo used the Arkenstonea stolen heirloom jewel, as leverage in an unsuccessful attempt to negotiate a compromise between the Dwarves, the Wood-elves, and the Men of Lake-town.

In so doing, Bilbo strained his relationship with Thorin; however, the two were reconciled at Thorin's deathbed following the Battle of the Five Armies.

bilbo and gandalf relationship goals

In addition to becoming wealthy from his share of the Dwarves' treasure, Bilbo found that he had traded respectability for experience and wisdom. At the end of the book, Gandalf proclaimed that Bilbo was no longer the Hobbit that he had been.

Please help rewrite it to explain the fiction more clearly and provide non-fictional perspective. October Learn how and when to remove this template message The Fellowship of the Ringthe first volume of The Lord of the Rings, begins with Bilbo's "eleventy-first" th birthday, 60 years after the beginning of The Hobbit. The main character of the novel is Frodo BagginsBilbo's cousin, [nb 1] who celebrates his 33rd birthday and legally comes of age on the same day.

bilbo and gandalf relationship goals

Though Frodo was actually "his first and second cousin once removed either way", [2] the two regarded each other as uncle and nephew. All this time Bilbo had kept his magic ring, with no idea of its significance, using it mostly to hide from his obnoxious cousins, the Sackville-Bagginseswhen they came to visit. The Ring had prolonged Bilbo's life beyond the normal hobbit span, and at he still looked While the Ring did not initially corrupt him as it had its previous owners, it was beginning to affect him; over the years, it had begun to prey on his mind when out of his sight, and he lost sleep and felt "thin, sort of stretched … like butter that has been scraped over too much bread".

He signed his home, Bag Endand estate over to Frodo. He then gave a farewell address to his neighbours, at the end of which he put on the Ring and vanished from sight. As Bilbo prepared finally to leave the house, he reacted with panic and suspicion when Gandalf tried to persuade him to leave the Ring with Frodo.